Friday, December 26, 2008

Gov. Blunt Grants Pardons, Allows Parole Hearing


Missouri Governor's Office Press Release Issued Dec. 24, 2008

JEFFERSON CITY - Gov. Matt Blunt today announced his decision to pardon Scott Flentge, Joy Howard Marshall, Sharo Shirshekan, and Joseph Siebrasse who all were convicted of non-violent offenses years ago and have since become and remained law-abiding citizens. In addition, the governor announced action to allow a parole hearing for Gregory Naeger.

“Scott Flentge, Joy Howard Marshall, Sharo Shirshekan and Joseph Siebrasse have paid for their mistakes,” Gov. Blunt said. “It is my hope and belief that they will continue to be productive citizens.”

In 1979, at the age of 20, Scott Flentge, was convicted of forgery. He was sentenced to five years probation and has had no subsequent offenses. Mr. Flentge applied for a pardon in 2001.

In 1997, at the age of 22, Joy Howard Marshall, was convicted of passing a bad check. She was sentenced to two years probation, which she completed without incident. She has made restitution and remained a law abiding citizen. Ms. Marshall applied for a pardon in 2007.

In 1980, at the age of 29, Sharo Shirshekan, was convicted of stealing. He was sentenced to three years probation, which he completed without incident. He has made restitution and remained a law abiding citizen. Mr. Shirshekan applied for a pardon in 2008.

In 1996, at the age of 20, Joseph Siebrasse was convicted of stealing. He was sentenced to five years probation, which he served without incident. He remains a law abiding citizen who serves our country in uniform. He applied for a pardon in 2007.

As governor, Matt Blunt has granted a total of 14 pardons, including those announced today, and denied nearly 1800.

Additionally, the governor took action to allow Gregory Naeger a hearing before the Board of Probation and Parole. In 2001, at the age of 24, Gregory Naeger, was convicted of second degree burglary, attempted felony stealing and attempted escape.

Mr. Naeger was sentenced to seventeen years, but the Board of Probation and Parole recommended to the governor that his sentence be shortened to twelve years because of legal issues with the seventeen year sentence. Mr. Naeger’s application was supported by nearly 30 Missourians who advocated for him.

Missouri’s Probation and Parole Board unanimously recommended that a pardon/commutation be issued in all cases.

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